Kent raises fees prior to receiving government approval

Month: July 2016

Kent raises fees prior to receiving government approval

The University of Kent has announced an increase of fees £250 above the fee cap of £9,000 agreed in 2012. According to the University’s website, this is due to apply to students starting in 2017 onwards. This decision has been based on a white paper presented by Universities and Science Minister, Jo Johnson. Success as a Knowledge Economy proposes an Ofsted style system to be implemented in British universities. Institutions which were deemed to perform well would receive “incentives” in the form of the ability to charge students higher fees in line with inflation. The justification behind this was…

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Calling all poets: London anthology project now open for submissions

Calling all poets, budding writers, and London goers: a very special London-themed poetry anthology, in collaboration with The Alexandra Wylie Tower Foundation, is now open for submissions! The story behind the project The Alexandra Wylie Tower Foundation was set up by Lindsey and Rob Wylie in memory of their only daughter, Alexandra, an inspiring 17-year-old girl, who sadly passed away in 2010 from a rare and incurable form of cancer that she had been battling for almost two years. Throughout her life, she worked hard at school, getting 9 A*s at GCSE, and was determined to excel in everything…

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What British Politics Has Lost To Brexit

A lot of political commentaries will focus on the great loss of European institutions and influences and the affect they had on British politics over the last few decades but what also must not be ignored is the loss of certain election promises and values which the mire of post referendum fever and Brexit has swiftly digested in a ruthless manner. The ‘Camborne Project’ is well and truly dead and although I personally don’t overly mourn its departure, there will be aspects of David Cameron’s premiership the nation will soon miss and dare I say equally George Osborne’s management…

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Book Review: The Little Red Chairs by Edna O’Brien

The Little Red Chairs is currently the book of the month at Waterstones and is certainly having a widescale impact on readers, after a ten-year gap between O’Brien’s last novel. The novel is divided into several parts, starting off in a small innocent Irish village, where the residents appear slightly naïve to the dangers of the mysterious new arrival, an exotic man with an intriguing and mesmerising demeanour who claims to have arrived as some kind of ‘holistic healer.’ As the blurb suggests, one woman in particular is taken in by his ‘charm,’ which leads to extraordinary and horrific…

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